Anaphylaxis after zoster vaccine: Implicating alpha-gal allergy as a possible mechanism.

“Gelatin and other nonprimate mammal–derived products are common excipient ingredients in several vaccines, and it has been postulated that patients with alpha-gal allergy might react to these vaccines.” The journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2017
http://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(16)31455-5/fulltext


Chickenpox attributable to a vaccine virus contracted from a vaccinee with zoster.

“Five months after 2 siblings were immunized with varicella vaccine, 1 developed zoster. Two weeks later the second sibling got a mild case of chicken pox. Virus isolated from the latter was found to be vaccine type. Thus, the vaccine strain was transmitted from the vaccinee with zoster to his sibling. Vaccinees who later develop zoster must be considered contagious.” Pediatrics 2000
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/10920184


Disseminated, persistent, and fatal infection due to the vaccine strain of varicella-zoster virus in an adult following stem cell transplantation.

Here, we describe the fatality of an immunocompromised patient who received the varicella vaccine.” Clinical Infectious Diseases 2015
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/25452596


Herpes zoster due to Oka vaccine strain of varicella zoster virus in an immunosuppressed child post cord blood transplant.

“A 5-year-old boy was vaccinated with the Oka strain of varicella zoster virus vaccine before cord blood transplant for chronic granulomatous disease in 2005. In 2006, he developed herpes zoster on his left arm. DNA from the vesicular rash confirmed the Oka vaccine strain of varicella zoster virus caused this complication. He responded well to 10 days of aciclovir treatment.” Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 2007
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/17854459


Herpes zoster in an adult recipient of live attenuated varicella vaccine

“A healthy 30-y-old female physician who was immunized with two doses of live attenuated varicella vaccine developed a localized case of zoster involving the right T8-10 dermatomes 36 mo after vaccination. The virus isolated from her rash was an unusual wild-type of varicella-zoster virus.” The Journal of Infectious Diseases 1986
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/2547882


Herpes zoster stromal keratitis after varicella vaccine booster in a pediatric patient.

“In this study, the case of a healthy pediatric patient who presented with herpes zoster (HZ) stromal keratitis after vaccination with live attenuated varicella vaccine (Varivax) and subsequent booster is described.” Cornea 2014
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/25062334


Live, attenuated varicella zoster vaccination of an immunocompromised patient

“A vaccine for the prevention of herpes zoster outbreaks in adults over the age of 60 years has recently been approved. A 76-year-old white female with a history of recurrent left axillary breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy was given a Zostavax injection by her primary care physician.” Journal of General Internal Medicine 2008
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/18286341


Reactivation of herpes zoster keratitis in an adult after varicella zoster vaccination

“In this study, the case of a patient who presented with reactivation of herpes zoster (HZ) keratitis and worsening of neurotrophic keratopathy, keratouveitis, and keratoconjunctivitis sicca after vaccination with live attenuated HZ vaccine (Zostavax) is described.” Cornea 2013
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/23187165


Safety of live vaccinations on immunosuppressive therapy in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, solid organ transplantation or after bone-marrow transplantation – A systematic review of randomized trials, observational studies and case reports.

“However, some serious vaccine-related adverse events occurred. 32 participants developed an infection with the vaccine strain; in most cases the infection was mild. However, in two patients fatal infections were reported” Vaccine 2017
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/28162821


Severe Autoimmune Adverse Events Post Herpes Zoster Vaccine: A Case-Control Study of Adverse Events in a National Database.

“Our study showed no significantly increased risks of severe autoimmune adverse events, except arthritis and alopecia, after vaccination.” Journal of Drugs in Dermatology 2015
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26151783/


Vaccines, biotechnology and their connection with induced abortion

Diploid cells (WI-38, MRC-5) vaccines have their origin in induced abortions. Among these vaccines we fi nd the following: rubella, measles, mumps, rabies, polio, smallpox, hepatitis A, chickenpox, and herpes zoster. Nowadays, other abortion tainted vaccines cultivated on transformed cells (293, PER.C6) are in the pipeline: flu, Respiratory Syncytial and parainfluenza viruses, HIV, West Nile virus, Ebola, Marburg and Lassa, hepatitis B and C, foot and mouth disease, Japanese encephalitis, dengue, tuberculosis, anthrax, plague, tetanus and malariaCuadernos De Bioetica 2008
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/18611078/


Varicella Zoster Virus DNA at Inoculation Sites and in Saliva After Zostavax Immunization

“Analysis of 36 individuals over age 60 years who were immunized with Zostavax revealed varicella zoster virus (VZV) DNA in swabs of skin inoculation sites obtained immediately after immunization in 18 (50%) of 36 subjects (copy number per nanogram of total DNA, 28 to 2.1 × 106) and in saliva collected over 28 days in 21 (58%) of 36 subjects (copy number, 20 to 248). Genotypic analysis of DNA extracted from 9 random saliva samples identified vaccine virus in all instances. In some immunized individuals over age 60, vaccine virus DNA is shed in saliva up to 4 weeks.” The Journal of Infectious Diseases 2011 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3096786/


Chickenpox vaccination does increase shingles cases, but mainly in young adults

“Vaccinating one-year-olds against chickenpox could temporarily nearly double the incidence of shingles in the wider population.”
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150811103555.htm


Varicella Zoster Virus DNA at Inoculation Sites and in Saliva After Zostavax Immunization

“Finally, that while transmission of vaccine virus has not been found among vaccine recipients, the detection of VZV DNA in saliva of Zostavax recipients for up to 28 days suggests that contact with saliva of recently immunized individuals represents a potential source of transmission.”
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3096786/

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